Author Topic: A Social Experiment With Gamblers As The Subject.  (Read 606 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

MickyP

A Social Experiment With Gamblers As The Subject.
« on: December 25, 2018, 07:26:02 AM »
This is going to epic.
 

Re: A Social Experiment With Gamblers As The Subject.
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2018, 07:28:58 AM »
22-Black
 
The following users thanked this post: MickyP, Third

mr j

Re: A Social Experiment With Gamblers As The Subject.
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2018, 01:21:07 PM »
  Apple Pie a la Mode
 
The following users thanked this post: MickyP, Olidammara

MickyP

Re: A Social Experiment With Gamblers As The Subject.
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2018, 05:24:28 PM »
Here is what Ken is alluding to...

This is direct from Wikipedia.

History[edit]Pie à la Mode was first invented and named by Barbara Lincoln in England, in 1888.Over five decades later, in 1936, an erroneous claim was made that Pie à la Mode was first invented at the Cambridge Hotel in Cambridge, Washington County, New York, in the 1890s.[1] Charles Watson Townsend, in Cambridge, NY[edit]The claim is that while visiting the hotel, Professor Charles Watson Townsend ordered a slice of apple pie with ice cream. When asked by another guest what he called the dish, he replied it did not have a name. The guest, Miss Barbara Lincoln named it Pie à la Mode. Professor Townsend subsequently ordered it by that name every day during his stay. When he later ordered it by that name at Delmonico's Restaurant in New York City, the waiter responded that he had never heard of it. Prof. Townsend chastised the waiter by stating:Do you mean to tell me that so famous an eating place as Delmonico's has never heard of Pie à la Mode, when the Hotel Cambridge, up in the village of Cambridge, NY serves it every day? Call the manager at once, I demand as good serve [sic] here as I get in Cambridge.[1] The manager, when called by the waiter, declared "Delmonico's never intends that any other shall get ahead of it... Forthwith, pie à la mode will be featured on the menu every day".[2] A reporter for the New York Sun newspaper overheard the disturbance and wrote an article about it the next day. Soon, Pie à la Mode became a standard on menus around the United States.[1][2]
When Charles Watson Townsend, died on May 20, 1936, a controversy developed as to who really invented Pie à la Mode. The New York Times reported that “Pie à la Mode” was first invented by Townsend at the Cambridge Hotel in Cambridge, New York in the late 1800s. It was later reported by several sources that Townsend ordered pie and ice cream at the Cambridge Hotel in 1896, and thus invented the dessert. The legend also states that a reporter from The Sun newspaper in New York overheard a conversation between the manager of Delmonico's Restaurant and Charles Townsend. The reporter was said to have written about the incident in the very next issue of The Sun.[3][4]
After an extensive digital archive search of The Sun as well as the New York Tribune and the New York Times, no such article has been found. This casts a serious shadow on the validity of the Townsend story.[citation needed]

And as the story is told shedding doubt on possible fact so too shall this thread shed doubt on the facts of the great cons in the world of roulette.
« Last Edit: December 25, 2018, 05:28:40 PM by MickyP »
 
The following users thanked this post: mr j, Third, Olidammara

Third

Re: A Social Experiment With Gamblers As The Subject.
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2018, 07:23:33 AM »
2-Black
 
The following users thanked this post: MickyP, Olidammara

MickyP

Re: A Social Experiment With Gamblers As The Subject.
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2018, 11:51:43 AM »
"Low risk and moderate risk gamblers are surrounded by gamblers (as well as smokers and drinkers), more so than non-gamblers and non-problem gamblers, but less so than problem gamblers. Approximately 50% of the most influential people in their lives are gamblers. Low risk and moderate risk gamblers are also surrounded by, and gamble with, more people who experience gambling-related harm compared to non-gamblers and non-problem gamblers, but less so than problem gamblers."
Quoted from a study conducted by The Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

In my research I came across the above study recently conducted down under. I have highlighted in red a very interesting statement from the study.
I have downloaded the study (PDF file) and tried to attach it for anyone interested but unfortunately the file is too big.

The study is titled:

"Social influences on gamblers by risk group: An egocentric social network analysis"