Author Topic: great article(s)  (Read 796 times)

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mr j

 

mr j

Re: great article(s)
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2018, 09:52:37 PM »
The amount you bet doesn't change the house edge on the game. A few points I raised via e-mail with those who wrote with additional questions:
 
  • If you start a betting progression with $5 bets, you wind up wagering more money than someone with $5 flat bets, so in the long run losses will be much larger with the progression. If your progression leads to an average bet of $15 a hand, for instance, your results will mirror those of someone flat betting $15 a hand.
  • Some progressive bettors put a cap on the largest bet. If you don't put a cap on the progression, and just keep increasing your bet until you lose, then you are pretty much guaranteed to lose your largest bet.
  • If you're an average player facing a 2% house edge, then in the long run, you'll lose $20 per $1,000 wagered if you bet flat, and $20 per $1,000 wagered if you use a progression. If you're a basic strategy player facing a half-percent house edge, you'll lose $5 per $1,000 wagered if you bet flat, and $5 per $1,000 wagered if you use a progression. The difference is how you get there. The progression will lead to larger wins, but more frequent losses.
  • If your progression could change the math, the house would run you out, just like they do card counters. But the pros who run the joints know the math is the math is the math.
 
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mr j

Re: great article(s)
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2018, 08:34:29 PM »
I think this needs to be shot back up.  :-*

Ken
 

mr j

Re: great article(s)
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2018, 07:04:11 PM »
The amount you bet doesn't change the house edge on the game. A few points I raised via e-mail with those who wrote with additional questions:
 
  • If you start a betting progression with $5 bets, you wind up wagering more money than someone with $5 flat bets, so in the long run losses will be much larger with the progression. If your progression leads to an average bet of $15 a hand, for instance, your results will mirror those of someone flat betting $15 a hand.
  • Some progressive bettors put a cap on the largest bet. If you don't put a cap on the progression, and just keep increasing your bet until you lose, then you are pretty much guaranteed to lose your largest bet.
  • If you're an average player facing a 2% house edge, then in the long run, you'll lose $20 per $1,000 wagered if you bet flat, and $20 per $1,000 wagered if you use a progression. If you're a basic strategy player facing a half-percent house edge, you'll lose $5 per $1,000 wagered if you bet flat, and $5 per $1,000 wagered if you use a progression. The difference is how you get there. The progression will lead to larger wins, but more frequent losses.
  • If your progression could change the math, the house would run you out, just like they do card counters. But the pros who run the joints know the math is the math is the math.

Keep in mind, these are not my quotes (although I do agree). These are from the above PROFESSIONAL out of LV. Great article BTW. I tend to listen to the guys/gals that KNOW MORE than I do. Those people are MY teachers and I am grateful !!!!!

Ken